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These stunning paintings by Filipino artists are made of polluted water

Salma Rahman | Updated on: 6 June 2016, 17:57 IST

A group of artists in the Philippines have stumbled upon a rather unique method to spread awareness about the ill-effects of water pollution.

The artists make use of murky, filthy water from the most polluted rivers and tributaries of the Philippines capital to create works of art.

Water collection from a polluted river (Photo: Youtube/ TBWA/SMP)

The Dirty Watercolour project, by ABS-CBN Lingkod Kapamilya Foundation, is aimed at creating awareness about the alarming water pollution levels in the rivers of Philippines.

Paint samples (Photo: Facebook/TBWASMP)

Nine painters were commissioned by the Filipino ad agency, TBWASMP, to create 22 pieces of art. Each piece depicts a scene from the river bank in the area.

Artists Toti Cerda, John Carlo Vargas, Kean Barrameda, Fred Failano, Allan Clerigo, Van Isunza, Luigi Almuena, Renee Ysabelle Jose and John Ed De Vera collaborated to turn the project into reality.

The results will leave you spell-bound.

Photo: Youtube/TBWA/SMP

Artists Toti Cerda, John Carlo Vargas, Kean Barrameda, Fred Failano, Allan Clerigo, Van Isunza, Luigi Almuena, Renee Ysabelle Jose and John Ed De Vera collaborated to turn the project into reality.

The results will leave you spell-bound.

Photo: Facebook/TBWASMP
Photo: facebook/TBWA/SMP
Photo: Facebook/TBWA/SMP

Reviving the dead rivers

According to Greenpeace, at least 50 of the 421 rivers in the Philippines have been declared "biologically dead" because they have been depleted of oxygen and therefore can't support very many marine lifeforms.

The major inspiration for the project is the 25km-long Pasig river - Manila's longest river, which feeds tributaries such as the Marikina and San Juan Rivers.

"At first it was difficult because it was the first time I experienced using dirty pigments, and second was the smell," painter JC Vargas told Reuters. "Although the pigments have already been decontaminated, the smell of the sludge was still present, so that was a big challenge for us artists," Vargas said.

"Even without the usual colours, the artists came up with beautiful images that are full of emotions. Emotions that colour the Filipino life," said Melvin Mangada, agency head of TBWASMP.

The project, which has been displayed at various spots in Manila city, is also aimed at raising funds to rejuvenate these water bodies.

First published: 6 June 2016, 17:57 IST
 
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