Home » international news » In pictures: Mosul's historic Grand Mosque of al-Nuri destroyed by ISIS
 

In pictures: Mosul's historic Grand Mosque of al-Nuri destroyed by ISIS

Sehar Qazi | Updated on: 23 June 2017, 17:15 IST
A picture taken on June 20, 2017 shows Mosul's leaning Al-Hadba minaret as the Iraqi forces advance towards the Old City to retake the last district still held by the Islamic State (IS) group fighters (AFP PHOTO / MOHAMED EL-SHAHED)

The Great Mosque of al-Nuri was arguably Mosul's biggest landmark. It's famous leaning al-Hadba minaret had towered over the Mosul cityscape for 850 years. On Thursday, the minaret and mosque lay in ruins, demolished by retreating Islamic State militants. The mosque was the latest casualty of the Islamic State's ongoing wave of destruction, even as the organisation itself nears total annihilation.

An Iraqi policeman displays a 10,000-Iraqi dinar banknote bearing an image of Mosul's iconic leaning minaret, known as the (AFP PHOTO / MOHAMED EL-SHAHED)
Iraqis flee from the Old City of Mosul on June 22, 2017, during the ongoing offensive by Iraqi forces to retake the last district still held by the Islamic State (IS) group. (AFP PHOTO / AHMAD AL-RUBAYE)

Located on the southern edge of the Old city, the last Islamic State stronghold inside Mosul, the mosque was named after Nuruddin al-Zanki, a noble who fought the early crusades. More recently, it was where Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared his Islamic caliphate in 2014, shortly after Islamic State seized swathes of Syria and Iraq. Their black flag has been flying on the al-Hadba minaret ever since.

Iraqis flee from the Old City of Mosul on June 22, 2017, during the ongoing offensive by Iraqi forces to retake the last district still held by the Islamic State (IS) group. (AFP PHOTO / AHMAD AL-RUBAYE)
Members of the Iraqi anti-terrorism forces (CTS) advance in the Old City of Mosul,during the ongoing offensive by Iraqi forces to retake the last district still held by the Islamic State (IS) group. (AFP PHOTO / AHMAD AL-RUBAYE)

The mosque was destroyed with explosives, as Islamic State militants purportedly sought to prevent its capture by Iraqi forces. However, it is being seen as a symbolic admittance of defeat. The Islamic State's Amaq News agency has argued that the mosque had been destroyed by a US airstrike, however, the US lead coalition had firmly denied this.

An image grab taken from a video relesead online by the Islamic state group's Amaq propaganda agency on 23June, 2017 (AFP PHOTO / AMAQ NEWS AGENCY)
First published: 23 June 2017, 17:15 IST
 
PREVIOUS STORY
NEXT STORY